Visual Analysis Essay - Naruto Forums
  • Free Naruto Games
  • Naruto Wallpaper
  • Want a Good Laugh Check out These Funny Pics
Welcome to the Naruto Forums. If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Notices

Go Back   Naruto Forums > Downtown Konoha > The NF Café > Konoha University
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-01-2007, 03:37 PM   #1
303aegiszx
Utada Hikaru Fan Club
Academy Teacher
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 449
303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future
Send a message via AIM to 303aegiszx
Thumbs up Visual Analysis Essay

I have to hand in a visual analysis essay on Tuesday on this painting:
http://www.pbs.org/art21/slideshow/a...-paint-005.jpg

I've met with the writing advisor now I'd like to hear what other students think. I wrote this in 4 hours? Not much time.. but I'm going to spend the rest of this weekend on it, hopefully.. so long as I can get some ideas/feedback. Thanks ~

Spoiler:

Walton Ford, The Orientalist, 1999 Painting


Orientalism, which is the study of the far-east, appears to be the topic of debate here. There is always humour in a subject. And on the topic that usually portrays people or markets, this painting by Walton Ford shows neither but a monkey and its device. In The Orientalist, there is the humour in discovery and colonisation. “In the 18th Century, travel began to change the picture.” (Shearer 676) It was the change in cultural differences that fascinated western civilization and prompted explorers and artists to want to learn more and more of the east. In The Orientalist, Ford uses a monkey and it’s device to show the unveiling of the east by the west.

The monkey being displayed is holding onto the tree branch or rope. The outline of the monkey looks as though it is parallel to the device which our eyes are drawn to. The device is shown as in the process of tracing a skull. It’s interesting how the lines area used here because it gives a continuing effect. As mentioned, the monkey is parallel to the device, which implies that it has much relation to the use and meaning of the skull, which is connected to the tracing device. Especially since it is within proximity of the device. Aside from the line use, the colours are presented exceptionally as well. There is a contrast here: the sky is white and everything else is dark. Low keyed, which sets a mood that says, “I’m here.” Giving that sand and desert feel. The colours are not very strong or bold but they work well enough with the piece so it balances out. If the colour scheme were high keys and tints, then that’d be a different story. Given that it is supposed to have relation to Orientalism, the colours work well. The colours used to depict the meaning work due to the fact that the values of the colours are low. There’s not much colour, very minimal to brown, grey, white, and a bit of orange. The low-key colours give it a very blunt message that is portrayed. Simple, but even more complex, the more you try to understand the painting, more unveils itself. Therefore the emphasis is placed on the form of the monkey and the device.

The focal point is the face of the monkey and how it is gazing at the audience. Because emphasis is placed on the monkey and the skull, our eyes are diverted from everything else in the painting. “Europeans are visually absent but psychologically present because they constitute the all-seeing, all-powerful gaze.” (Mackenzie 46). Notice how the monkey is gazing at the audience. The title of the piece can be read as “the other”. We see those we don’t know as the other or outsider. This could mean that foreigners often gaze at westerners just as how western societies were gazing back at the east. Because the past its been white, male, rich, the painting now reverses that and puts the monkey into the Orientals place and making the skull the object of study. Previously mentioned, the monkey is placed within proximity of the device. If it were to be moved up more, the balance of the form and structure of the painting would be shifted drastically because Ford places the monkeys arms and legs just parallel to the device so the audience would take notice of both at the same time.

The depiction of the skull can be interpreted as a study. Which may imply that while the west is studying the east, the orientals are doing exactly the same. “The moral superiority of the West, able to preserve while the East destroyed, justified such plunder. “(Mackenzie 53) Why a skull and not a real head? Is it signifying destruction of the east or west? That would make sense because the west discovered the east and slowly brought upon destruction of the eastern nature and exploitation of the culture. When the west discovered the east, it was the beginning of the end. The west would acquire more knowledge thereore it was “just” for the east to be discovered. Thus, the irony in this piece is that the far east is studying the far west. Why the sun is setting instead of rising can be viewed as, the East no longer being preserved. Tracing or construction of the skull can be seen as the construction of the far east by the west. Ford reverses that and it is the monkey or the oriental, doing the constructing here. “Orientalist images imply timelessness, the absence of historical dynamic of progress that represents western superiority. Thus the East is, symbolically constructed in order to be dominated, devised to be ruled.” (Mackenzie 46) What’s going on here is, Ford is displaying the deconstruction of the east by using the orientalist as the constructor.

Ford does an excellent job with critiquing western society. It was rough due to the fact that only one side was hurt culturally while the other watched in amazement at the discoveries. As in archaeology, when something is discovered, there are questions to be asked and answers to seek. The colours that were low and dark instead of bright suggests the topic at hand, although was somewhat of an achievement, was in reality darker than most think on some scale. The form of the monkey, as well as the fact that he chooses an ape rather than a dog, contributes to the meaning of this piece and the message presented. How Ford depicted a creature using a man made device, which gives the impression that it’s “impossible” that something other than “us” can know how to use such things, and to our surprise, like how we gaze at others, they could just as well be gazing at us, isn’t it fascinating what you don’t know another person can do?



303aegiszx is offline   Reply With Quote
NarutoForums
        


Old 11-01-2007, 10:06 PM   #2
Amnesia
Phantasm
Examiner
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 806
Amnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is Celestial
Default

I'm going to apologize before hand because I'm a really, really picky editor... Feel free to toss my opinions out the window. Lol, I think I'm gonna have to go back to my English/Art Hist. major. I enjoyed this too much. And I had to divide the post into two since it wouldn’t let me post one long thing.

”Edited Essay”:

Quote:
Walton Ford, The Orientalist, 1999 Painting

Orientalism, which is the study of the far-east, appears to be the topic of debate here. There is always humour in a subject. And on the topic that usually portrays people or markets, this painting by Walton Ford shows neither but a monkey and its device.
A bit hard to understand there in particular. I would reword the second sentence and get rid of the 'and'. Starting a sentence with 'and' usually doesn't lead to good things. >.< I had the exact same habit, starting a sentence with 'and'... In as far as the "There is always humour in a subject." I'm not quite sure what you mean even after reading the rest of the paragraph. What exactly is humourous about the subject? The first sentence of the next quote kind of elaborates on the humour but I'm still rather confuzzled over that bit as a reader. (Not saying you have to make it funny, but I think you might be getting at an ironic sort of humour expressed by the painter. Or at least, that's how I understand it.)

Quote:
In The Orientalist, there is the humour in discovery and colonisation. “In the 18th Century, travel began to change the picture.” (Shearer 676) It was the change in cultural differences that fascinated western civilization and prompted explorers and artists to want to learn more and more of the east. In The Orientalist, Ford uses a monkey and it’s device to show the unveiling of the east by the west.
Between Shearer's quote and the starting sentence there could probably be a smoother transition. A little bit more elaboration on that humour mentionedi nthe above paragraph might work nicel. Also, this picture was painted in 1999 right? Or is it 1899? A little confusion about how a modern painting would reflect on 18th century ties between the East and West long since that particular era of colonization has past. Perhaps a little bit more context to give the reader a clearer idea of how the painting connects to "show the unveiling of the East by the West"? By the way, do you happen to know what the device is called? Just curious

Quote:
The monkey being displayed is holding onto the tree branch or rope. The outline of the monkey looks as though it is parallel to the device which our eyes are drawn to. The device is shown as in the process of tracing a skull. It’s interesting how the lines area used here because it gives a continuing effect. [b](A continuing effect of?)[b] As mentioned, the monkey is parallel to the device, which implies that it has much relation to the use and meaning of the skull, which is connected to the tracing device. Especially since it is within proximity of the device. Aside from the line use, the colours are presented exceptionally as well. There is a contrast here: the sky is white and everything else is dark. Low keyed, which sets a mood that says, “I’m here.” Giving that (<-- what is 'that'?)sand and desert feel. The colours are not very strong or bold but they work well enough with the piece so it balances out. If the colour scheme were high keys and tints, then that’d be a different story. (Unless an explanation is added, probably don't need this.) Given that it is supposed to have relation to Orientalism, the colours work well. (How so?)The colours used to depict the meaning work due to the fact that the values of the colours are low. There’s not much colour, very minimal to brown, grey, white, and a bit of orange. The low-key colours give it a very blunt message that is portrayed. (And the message is?)Simple, but even more complex, the more you try to understand the painting, more unveils itself. Therefore the emphasis is placed on the form of the monkey and the device.
Quite a few of my minor comments are marked in the paragraph. You've got a good analysis going although there are a few things that could be tweaked I think. Personally, I wouldn't use 'low-key/high-key' colors but rather something along the lines of 'somber/dark/light/vibrant/pastel/calm/etc.' to describe the colors. It seems rather odd, but that's probably just me. Gives a slightly more clear idea of what you mean.


Continued below.

Amnesia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2007, 10:09 PM   #3
Amnesia
Phantasm
Examiner
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 806
Amnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is CelestialAmnesia is Celestial
Default

Edited Essay PT II:

Quote:
The focal point is the face of the monkey and how it is gazing at the audience. Because emphasis is placed on the monkey and the skull, our eyes are diverted from everything else in the painting. “Europeans are visually absent but psychologically present because they constitute the all-seeing, all-powerful gaze.” (Mackenzie 46). Notice how the monkey is gazing at the audience. (Here, it seems like the paper is jumping from one idea, 'the all-seeing gaze' to 'the other' very abruptly. Perhaps, elaborate more on the gaze/monkey? Or a transition between the two ideas?)The title of the piece can be read as “the other”. We see those we don’t know as the other or outsider. This could mean that foreigners often gaze at westerners just as how western societies were gazing back at the east. (<-- This sentence seems a little off. Who are the foreigners? Peoples of the East?) Because the past its been white, male, rich, the painting now reverses that and puts the monkey into the Orientals place and making the skull the object of study.[b}(<-- A bit confusing. Reword or break into two sentences perhaps? I'm not quite sure who the monkey represents. Or what qualifies as 'white, male, and rich' though I assume you're talking about the West?)[/b] Previously mentioned, the monkey is placed within proximity of the device. If it were to be moved up more, the balance of the form and structure of the painting would be shifted drastically because Ford places the monkeys arms and legs just parallel to the device so the audience would take notice of both at the same time.
Out of curiosity, what exactly is the monker representing? East or West? I'm afraid I couldn't quite figure it out. Also, again, perhaps slightly smoother transitions between the Mackenzie quote and your analysis. And perhaps a bit more connecting the quote with your analysis. It seems to stick out a little. I can see the connection but it seems a bit on the weak side. Also, probably best to not begin a sentence with 'Because'. Kinda the same thing going with 'And'.

Quote:
The depiction of the skull can be interpreted as a study. Which may imply that while the west is studying the east, the orientals are doing exactly the same(To the West?). “The moral superiority of the West, able to preserve while the East destroyed, justified such plunder. “(Mackenzie 53). (<-- Seems like the quote was sort of plunked in. Perhaps a clearer explanation/connection to the rest of the paragraph?)Why a skull and not a real head? Is it signifying destruction of the east or west? That would make sense because the west discovered the east and slowly brought upon destruction of the eastern nature and exploitation of the culture. When the west discovered the east, it was the beginning of the end. The west would acquire more knowledge thereore it was “just” for the east to be discovered. Thus, the irony in this piece is that the far east is studying the far west. Why the sun is setting instead of rising can be viewed as, the East no longer being preserved. (<-- Probably just point out where the sun is in the painting. Lol, I had to go back and look for it for a while.) Tracing or construction of the skull can be seen as the construction of the far east by the west. Ford reverses that (idea?) and it is the monkey or the oriental, doing the constructing here. (Aaah, so here is what the monkey represents. I get it now...) “Orientalist images imply timelessness, the absence of historical dynamic of progress that represents western superiority. Thus the East is, symbolically constructed in order to be dominated, devised to be ruled.” (Mackenzie 46) What’s going on here is, Ford is displaying the deconstruction of the east by using the orientalist as the constructor.
Very nice ending analysis. Most of my comments are in the paragraph. Good paragraph. Some bits of information that were a little hazy earlier are now a lot more clear.

Quote:
Ford does an excellent job with critiquing western society. (How?) It was rough (What was 'rough'?)due to the fact that only one side was hurt culturally while the other watched in amazement at the discoveries. (Clarify which side was which.) As in archaeology, when something is discovered, there are questions to be asked and answers to seek. (<-- How does this relate to Ford's critique on Western society?)[/b]The colours that were low and dark instead of bright suggests the topic at hand, although was somewhat of an achievement, was in reality darker than most think on some scale. (<-- Good.) The form of the monkey, as well as the fact that he chooses an ape rather than a dog, contributes to the meaning of this piece and the message presented. (How?)How Ford depicted a creature using a man made device, which gives the impression that it’s “impossible” that something other than “us” can know how to use such things, and to our surprise, like how we gaze at others, they could just as well be gazing at us, isn’t it fascinating what you don’t know another person can do?
All comments marked in text.



I really like your ending sentence, although it could probably broken up into two if you want to still have the question at the end. Only real problems I could see were mostly lack of information in some cases, transitions, and organization. A bit of rewording would do some good as well. Only a few awkward bits to read since they interrupt the flow of your essay. Also, another suggestion that would probably make the paper more clear and organized would be to make each separate body paragraph a clear point in your argument. You got some great analysis going but the analysis usually ends up over taking the idea that the whole paragraph is supposed to get a cross. Or you can probably just break it up into multiple paragaphs with multiple points.

Amnesia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2007, 12:43 PM   #4
303aegiszx
Utada Hikaru Fan Club
Academy Teacher
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 449
303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future303aegiszx has a brilliant future
Send a message via AIM to 303aegiszx
Default

Ah thank you very much. Well I don't know what the device is. I did make some changes and also noticed there definitely needed to be more explanation on some of my points.

Spoiler:

Orientalism, which is the study of the far-east, is the issue painter Walton Ford uses in his painting The Orientalist. Orientalist painters usually portray people or markets, this painting by Walton Ford shows neither but a monkey and its device. In The Orientalist, there is the humour in discovery and colonisation in which the west discovered the hidden east. “In the 18th Century, travel began to change the picture.” (Shearer 676) It was the change in cultural differences that fascinated western civilization and prompted explorers and artists to want to learn more and more of the east. In The Orientalist, Ford uses a monkey and its device to show the unveiling of the east by the west but adds irony in turning it around and portraying the Orient as the one who is studying the other.

The monkey being displayed is holding onto the tree branch or rope. The outline of the monkey looks as though it is parallel to the device which our eyes are drawn to. It becomes thought provoking because here we have a monkey that is controlling a device that is in the process of tracing a skull. It’s interesting how the lines area used here because it gives a continuous effect. Aside from the line use, the colours are presented exceptionally well to add to the mood of the painting. There is a contrast here is in the sky that is light and the rest of the painting, which is dark. The colours are not very strong or bold but the placement presents the piece even enough with the piece so the contrast balances out. If the colour scheme were high keys and tints, then the mood of the painting would be different because different colours give off different vibes. Ford used colours that are calm and sombre. The colours used to depict the meaning of the painting work. Simple, but even more complex, the more you try to understand the painting, more unveils itself. Therefore the emphasis is placed on the form of the monkey and the device.

The focal point is the face of the gazing monkey. Emphasis is placed on the monkey and the skull to divert our eyes towards the object and topic of study in the painting. “Europeans are visually absent but psychologically present because they constitute the all-seeing, all-powerful gaze.” (Mackenzie 46). Notice how the monkey is gazing at the audience. The title of the piece can be read as “the other”. Humans will often see those we do not know as the stranger or the “other”. In the past it has been white, male, rich, the painting now reverses that and the Orient is now studying the researcher. Previously mentioned, the monkey is placed within proximity of the device to give assumption there is connection to the skull. If it were to be moved up more, the balance of the form and structure of the painting would be shifted drastically because Ford places the monkey’s arms and legs in a parallel position to the device therefore the audience would take notice of both at the same time. Also, he did not make the device too big or else the emphasis that is placed on the monkey would not be as strong.

Tracing of the skull can be seen as the construction of the far-east by the west. Ford reverses that and it is the monkey or the oriental, doing the constructing here. The depiction of the skull can be interpreted as a study. Ford implies that while the west is studying the east, the Orientals are doing the exact the same by studying the west. “The moral superiority of the West, able to preserve while the East destroyed, justified such plunder. “(Mackenzie 53) Why a skull rather than a full fleshed head signifies Ford depicting the deconstruction of the east. That would make sense because the west
discovered the east and quickly brought upon destruction of the eastern nature and exploitation of the culture. When the west discovered the east, it was the beginning of the end. The west would acquire more knowledge, skills, and traits. That was the “justified” reason for the east to be discovered. The irony in this piece is that the far-east is studying the far west. The setting sun on the right side of the painting can be viewed as, the East no longer being preserved. “Orientalist images imply timelessness, the absence of historical dynamic of progress that represents western superiority. Thus the East is, symbolically constructed in order to be dominated, devised to be ruled.” (Mackenzie 46) Ford displays the deconstruction of the east by using the Orient as the constructor.

Ford does an excellent job with critiquing western society. As in archaeology, when an artefact is discovered, there are questions to be asked and answers to seek. The colours that were low and dark instead of bright suggests the topic at hand, although was somewhat of an achievement, was in reality darker than most think on some scale. The form of the monkey, as well as the fact that he chooses an ape rather than a dog, contributes to the meaning of this piece and the message presented. Ford depicted a creature using a man made device, which gives the impression that it’s “impossible” that something other than “us” can know how to use such things, and to our surprise, like how we gaze at others, they could just as well be gazing at us, isn’t it fascinating what you don’t know another person can do?


303aegiszx is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts
BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump
Quick Style Chooser


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:33 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.    

Design(s) Provided By: Neado Designs

Lifetricks.com Bestlifehacks.org Ben10-games.org
Spiderman-games.com Buyanewcase.com Addicting Games